A Comparison of the U.S. and French Sunshine Reporting Requirements

This past year both the U.S. and France enacted substantial new reporting and disclosure requirements under their respective Sunshine Acts, which were designed to increase the transparency of the financial relationships between manufacturers and health care professionals and to allow patients to make more informed decisions regarding their health treatments. The U.S. and French Sunshine Acts are not identical, however, as indicated in this alert written by Reed Smith lawyers Elizabeth Carder-Thompson and Daniel Kadar. Their side-by-side review illustrates that the scope and focus of transparency differs between the U.S. and France. This alert includes a summary chart comparing and contrasting the differences in Sunshine Act reporting requirements in a number of areas including effective dates, who must report, what information must be reported, payment thresholds and categories of payments that must be reported as well as those that can be excluded. This information is especially relevant to global manufacturers working to comply with these provisions.

A copy of the full alert and comparison chart is available here.

Launch of the New French State Portal Allows for Electronic Information Disclosure by Health Care Companies

Reed Smith’s Global Regulatory Enforcement Law blog features a post on the recent launch of the new state portal in France. "The implementation of the French transparency regulation: first good news?," written by Reed Smith partner Daniel Kadar, discusses how the portal will allow health care companies to more easily disclose transparency information to the French government as required by the French Sunshine Act. The portal is thought to be “more customer friendly” for health care companies in that it provides three possible methods for the disclosure and transfer of information.

CMS Releases List of Teaching Hospitals; Educational Efforts and Requests for Additional Clarification Regarding the Physician Payment Sunshine Final Rule Continue

This post was written by Elizabeth Carder-Thompson, Katie C. Pawlitz and Nancy E. Bonifant.

In preparation for data collection to begin under the Physician Payment Sunshine Act Final Rule on August 1, 2013, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released yesterday the list of teaching hospital covered recipients to which payments and other transfers of value must be reported by applicable drug and device manufacturers.  The list, which will be updated annually by CMS at least 90-days before the beginning of a reporting year, can be found on CMS’ National Physician Payment Transparency Program: OPEN PAYMENTS website and includes approximately 1,100 legal business names that are organized by state and tax identification number.

CMS also announced this week that it will be holding a National Provider Call on Wednesday, May 22, 2013 at 2:30 PM EST, directed at physicians and teaching hospitals.  The agenda for the call includes an overview of the Final Rule, key dates, the role of covered recipients and resources available to covered recipients.

Meanwhile, stakeholders and their representatives, including the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed), have continued to seek additional clarification from CMS on a variety of outstanding questions.  These questions include whether journal reprints provided by a manufacturer to a physician or teaching hospital have a discernible economic value that triggers reporting requirements, what constitutes a payment or transfer of value to a teaching hospital as opposed to payments or transfers of value to an employee of the teaching hospital, and more.  Ideally, CMS will issue further guidance on these issues in sufficient time for applicable manufacturers to prepare for the data collection deadline this summer.

Seeing the Light With the Physician Payment Sunshine Act

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On February 1, 2013, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services released the long-awaited final rule implementing the physician payment transparency provisions, commonly referred to as the Physician Payment Sunshine Act, in the Obama administration's 2010 health care reform legislation. The Sunshine Act joins the list of significant federal laws addressing potential conflicts of interest in health care, including the Anti-Kickback Statute and the Stark Law. With implementation of the Sunshine Act now in sight, stakeholders face the real challenge of complying with, and practicing under the shadow of, the Sunshine Act and its complex and detailed regulations.

To read the full article "Seeing the Light With the Physician Payment Sunshine Act," please visit law.com.

Sunshine Physician Payment Final Rule Overview and Analysis

This post was written by Elizabeth B. Carder-Thompson, Katie C. Pawlitz and Nancy E. Bonifant.

On February 1, 2013, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released the long-awaited Final Rule to implement the “Sunshine” provisions of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA). The Sunshine provisions - intended to provide increased transparency on the scope and nature of financial and other relationships among manufacturers, physicians, and teaching hospitals - require that certain manufacturers of drugs, devices, biologicals, and medical supplies covered by Medicare, Medicaid and CHIP report annually to HHS identified payments or transfers of value they have made to physicians and teaching hospitals. In addition, they require manufacturers and certain group purchasing organizations (GPOs) to report to HHS information on physician ownership and investment interests.

The Final Rule provides needed clarity on some troubling aspects of the proposal, however, it leaves a number of questions unanswered. Please click here to read our detailed analysis of the Sunshine provisions, including an overview and summary of the Rule as well as discussion of the important issues that stakeholders should be considering as they prepare for Sunshine implementation.

Vermont Offers Limited Amnesty to Device and Biologic Manufacturers who Failed to Report Payments to Health Care Providers

This post was written by Katie C. Pawlitz.

Today the Office of the Vermont Attorney General announced that the Vermont Attorney General is offering limited amnesty to medical device and biologic manufacturers who have failed to report pursuant to Vermont’s Prescribed Products Gift Ban and Disclosure Law. The offer will remain open until October 1, 2012. In order to take advantage of the offer, manufacturers must email prescribedproducts@atg.state.vt.us with the following information: (1) manufacturer name; (2) reporting periods not reported; and (3) name, address, email, and phone number of the representative with whom Vermont should communicate.

The reporting obligation under the Vermont Law became effective July 1, 2009 and, to date, manufacturers have been required to report to Vermont with respect to three reporting periods. The amnesty offer is limited to financial penalties authorized under the Law and does not apply to back-payment of registration fees or penalties for violations of other aspects of the Law, such as gift ban violations. The Office of the Attorney General has indicated that it does not anticipate seeking full disclosure for unreported activity, but that it does anticipate requiring at a later date, disclosure of aggregate information regarding the activity.

CMS Announces Data Collection for the Physician Payments Sunshine Act Will Not Be Required Before 2013

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), tasked with implementing the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, announced yesterday that it will not require pharmaceutical, device, and other applicable manufacturers and group purchasing organizations (GPOs) to begin collecting reportable data before 2013.  Once implemented, the Physician Payments Sunshine Act (Section 6002 of the Affordable Care Act) will require manufacturers and GPOs to report information regarding payments to physicians and physician ownership and investment interests.

To learn more about this development regarding the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, please see the full post written by Elizabeth B. Carder-Thompson, Katie C. Pawlitz, Nancy E. Bonifant and Debra A. McCurdy on Reed Smith’s Health Industry Washington Watch blog.


 

Overview and Analysis of the Proposed Federal Sunshine Regulations

On December 19, 2011, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) published a proposed rule (the “Proposed Rule”) related to section 6002 of the Affordable Care Act, commonly referred to as the “Physician Payment Sunshine Act.” The Physician Payment Sunshine Act requires applicable manufacturers of drugs, devices, biologicals, or medical supplies covered under Medicare, Medicaid, or CHIP to report annually to the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (“Secretary”) certain payments or other transfers of value to physicians and teaching hospitals. Additionally, applicable manufacturers and applicable group purchasing organizations (“GPOs”) must report certain information regarding the ownership or investment interests in them that are held by physicians or their immediate family members.

To learn more about this development regarding the Physician Payment Sunshine Act, please see the full post written by Elizabeth B. Carder-Thompson, Katie C. Pawlitz, Nancy E. Bonifant and Debra A. McCurdy on Reed Smith’s Health Industry Washington Watch blog.

Health Care Companies Operating in France to be Subject to New Sunshine/Transparency Rules

This post was written by Marina Cousté, Benoît Charot, François Jonquères and Daniel Kadar.

Health care and cosmetic companies operating in France are subject to new transparency requirements, comparable to the U.S. "Sunshine Act," that were adopted in December 2011. As discussed in a recent posting on Reed Smith's Global Regulatory Enforcement Law Blog, in addition to imposing a general disclosure obligation on any company manufacturing or commercializing products with a medical or cosmetic purpose, the new law sets forth new pharmacovigilance requirements and provides more stringent rules concerning the advertisement of drugs and medical and diagnostics devices.